Tag Archives: K-5

Classroom Camping Theme

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Classroom Camping Theme

Cool camping theme for classroom!

I’ve been craving a camping trip, but that’s not going to happen for another 4 weeks at least (that’s how much longer I’ll be living in my university home in China), but hopefully it’ll happen when I return to the U.S. (and my camping gear) this summer!

<—Meet my fiance, Dan.  He’s packing up after a camping trip in N. Carolina last summer.  He’s an efficient packer–uses his head when he runs out of hands.  🙂

Anyway, It got me thinking, and I’m now tossing around the idea of a camping themed classroom for next year.  I started searching the net for anything helpful that I might be able to use for next year and found a TON of ideas and listed them here!  Using a few key pieces and a little creativity can go a long way in developing the perfect theme.  I’d love to know if any of you have done a camping theme in your classroom and which ideas worked out the best for your little campers!

Text Structure Bookmark Freebie

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It seems to me that text structure questions come up an awful lot on standardized tests.  I prepare my students with these bookmarks.  Students use them to identify the text structure in their book (or a stack of books that I dump on their group’s table during whole class activities).

Print, cut apart, and give each student or group their own set.  Laminate for longer life and reuse again and again!

Make it a game!  Students love the challenge of finding one of each type of structure.

Ace to King Review Game Freebie

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Ace to King Review Game Freebie

Lately, to mix things up, I’ve been making a lot of my classroom activities more game like by using playing cards.  “Ace to King Review” is something I’ve been using for vocabulary review.  The idea is basic, and students pick up on the game quickly.  All you need is a projector, playing cards, and a key for your students to check each other’s verbal responses.  I’ve used parts of speech vocabulary words for fourth grade, but you can use any vocabulary words you want.

Rules (also listed on the slide show below): Students work in pairs.  Give them a partial deck of cards (Hand out the same number to everyone, but don’t worry if everyone has different face values.  If you play this a few times, eventually, every student will be asked for every definition at least once.)  Partner 1 draws a card, which corresponds to a word projected on the board.  They attempt to define the word, and Partner 2 agrees, disagrees, or checks the printed answer key (found after the question slide).  Partner 1 gets to keep all the cards that they answered correctly, and gives back the wrong answers to try again.  There is no question for the “Joker” card, so students can choose any word they want when they draw this card!

The Google Docs slide show is below, and you can download it using the little gear icon below the presentation box.  Feel free to try it out, adapt it, and let me know how it goes!

(I notice that the above frame seems to cut off the bottom of some slides–don’t worry, the downloaded version works fine!)

Weekly Literacy Homework Page

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Weekly Literacy Homework Page

I was thinking there might be a few teachers out there with schools that are tight with paper like mine.  I originally formatted this weekly homework page format when we were asked to use less paper, but I had no idea how much I’d love it!  One page makes my life so much easier!

Each Monday, students are given a single homework page which has been printed on front and back and 3-hole-punched.  They pop it into their homework folder (a cheapo card stock folder with 3 brads and 2 pockets) and do 1/4 of the page each evening.  Just a heads up, these little pages are packed with info.  There isn’t a lot of white space, but my 4th graders have never had a problem with the amount of material on each page.  They quickly mastered the familiar weekly format.  Mine love routine, and the four standard sections (1. Reading for Information/Paragraph Attack 2. Word Work/Writing  3. Mixed Genre/Paragraph Attack  4. Context Clues/Vocabulary/Spelling) ensure I’m providing additional homework practice equally across my literacy curriculum.

Below is my general template.  (The first passage is from an AWESOME site, K12Reader, which has with tons of leveled passages based on content areas–check it out, really, it’s the best I’ve found.  The second passage I borrowed from…well, the Internet somewhere a while back.  If you recognize it, let me know and I’ll cite the source!  The crossword puzzle was made on Tools for Educator’s Puzzle Maker–another a super handy site!)

Download the Weekly Homework Page Format

1 page homework:

1. Get more bang for your buck: Use .25 inch margins.  Set your spacing is to single space (not 1.5).  It makes a difference!

2.  Decide on your weekly sections and label each day’s homework with the day and section title.  (Ex. Monday: Reading for Information/Paragraph Attack)  Also include easy to follow directions.

3. Have a place for student names at the top of each side of the paper.  This way, no matter how it’s laid out on their desk (I do homework checks while they are at specials), you can easily see whose you’re looking at.

4.  Tie the homework’s content to your specific curriculum standards each week, and use the same section headings each week.  I use a different activity type each day.  This helps students get familiar with many different question styles (standardized test prep anyone?).  Also, if a student really dislikes a certain type of activity (let’s say Tuesday’s writing activity is a real drag for them), they only see it once that week, and are more likely to just get it done instead of skipping it all together (like they might if I had a whole week of writing activities).  Also, I’m sure I’m preaching to the choir here, but it has to be said that homework should offer a very specific and tailored practice session outside of the classroom, not be random or busy work.  When the students open their homework each night, they should think, “Oh yeah, this is similar to what we did in class today.”  Provide hints or reminder sections for material you know could trip up your students.   They may not have an adult at home to help them if they get stuck.  Give them the tools they’ll need to review or extend what was taught in class.

5. Decide how you will check the homework.  I provide a key at the front of the room, and students check their work with a marker when they enter the class each day.  During certain times of the year, I may even make a matrix for them to mark their incorrect answers, so I can see at a glance which problems were the most difficult for the class as a whole. (I’ll try to find that matrix and post it here eventually!)  However, most times of the year, I do a quick glance over during specials (not to record grades, but to see the problem areas and who did/did not do the homework).  Then, I may pull certain students during the day to discuss problem areas.

This homework is specifically for a literacy classroom, so the sections are tied only to literacy.  However, if you want to provide homework for all subject areas, just change up your sections (Ex. Monday: Science Read and Respond Passage,  Tuesday: Writing about Social Studies, Wednesday: Math Concepts, Thursday: Health Read and Respond Passage).

How do you use and manage meaningful homework in your classroom?  I’d love to hear your ideas!

Dollar Store Goodie: Timers

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Dollar Store Goodie: Timers

Ever have those student that seem to spend mysteriously large amounts of time in the media center or running errands around the school? I have a few of these, and I found a simple (and cheap!) solution–Dollar Store Timers!  The timers shown are from the Dollar Tree, but any digital timer will work!

First, attach the timer to the media center pass. My library pass is on a long necklace, reducing how many times it’s lost while students search for books. I wrap the necklace string around the plastic stand piece on the back of the timer and then make it stay with a piece of masking tape.

Next, with your students, determine how much time is needed to get to the media center, search, and get back to the classroom. You can even have a few students run some time trails during their media center trips that day. You can always tweak this time as you see fit if it’s too much or too little time. My students use 4 minutes.

Then, teach the students how to set the timer for your chosen time and also STOP the timer’s alarm. I did NOT want my students to be causing a ruckus in the media center, so we practiced hitting the stop button as quickly as possible. This way, IF the timer did go off in the media center, they wouldn’t be distracting others.

Finally, teach the students WHEN to start and stop the timer. The beeping isn’t loud, but I asked my students to set the timer as soon as they stepped out of the classroom and just outside the door when they returned. This way, they weren’t distracting anyone with the tiny “beep beep” the buttons make.

This process really improved the efficiency of every media center visit, made students plan what they would search for before ever reaching the media center, and helped with their time estimation skills. ALSO, the Media Specialist LOVED it. She told me that she wished all the teachers would use the timers, because it eliminated the fooling around that she had to deal with in the media center! She said the students would look down at the timer and then pick up the pace in making their selection.

How do YOU encourage your students to use their time wisely? I’d love to hear your ideas!